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Formal Capstone Written Report Format: 

Part I. Front Matter
Characterized (except for the cover page) by the lower-case roman numeral page numbers, the contents known as "Front Matter" includes the cover sheet, acknowledgements, abstract, contents, and lists of figures & tables.



 i. Cover Sheet: Produce a plain cover sheet using the following format & contents as a format guide: Use correct class nomenclature, dates, etc.

 

 

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

ETME 489R CAPSTONE: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY DESIGN I

and

EMEC 489R CAPSTONE: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN I

TITLE OF PROJECT

by

Name

Name

Name

 

for: {list in order the Course Instructor,  Project Supervisor, and Sponsor }

Prepared to Partially Fulfill the Requirements for MET456/ME404

Department of Mechanical Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, MT 59717

Month Day, 2014

(omit page # from cover sheet)

 

 

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ii. Acknowledgements: (if present, appears as page ii)

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This is where you may recognize the efforts of people that have provided assistance to you in your work. Use a prose style, rather than a list. Express gratitude if the contribution was truly important but do not gush. Incidental contacts or minor contributions need not be acknowledged.

ii

 

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iii. Abstract / Executive Summary: (appears as page iii)


Executive Summary

An executive summary is to be included that covers the entire report: It is not merely an introduction but rather a stand alone, document which should be easily understood by a reader even if taken out of the context of the report. It should be NO GREATER THAN two pages in length, either single or double spaced. (1.5 line spacing is also a good option.)  The Executive Summary (sometimes called an "ABSTRACT") provides a brief description of the entire project report and includes:

1. The project origin, definition, and objectives;
2. The methods and procedures used to meet the project objectives; and
3. The principle results obtained.

Many abstract examples are available for review in professional journals, theses, and patent literature.

For this ME/MET capstone deliverable, an additional component is requested that is rarely included in an Executive Summary prepared for other purposes: We require that every project group include in their Executive Summary a concise and thoughtful discussion of how and to what degree your Capstone Project Experience provided you and your student peers with

(1)    an understanding of the impact of your engineering solutions in a
•    global,
•    economic,
•    environmental, and
•    societal context;

Not all projects will have impacts in all these areas, but many do: Be sure to expound on any of these areas that apply.

(2)     a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;

Lifelong learning can be construed as the ability to gain a better understanding of a topic not previously encountered, via self-study. All capstone project groups engage in this activity, in fact it is a key part of the design process! This should be an easy entry.

(3)    a knowledge of contemporary issues; (For example, contemporary issues might include sustainability, climate change, energy, population, etc.)

Again, not all project groups encounter contemporary issues but most do, at least peripherally. Please describe any that apply.


iii

 

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iv. Table of Contents: (assumes next sequential l.c. roman numeral page #)
 Include correct page numbers of the front matter, body, and appendices. Number values shown are representative of typical report page counts.
A good table of contents (TOC) helps when reading a report. Sufficient detail should be provided so that a reader can quickly locate topics of interest. Chapter headings alone are sometimes insufficient for long report chapters; use sub-chapter breaks in the TOC for major changes of topic within a chapter. Maintain alignment of page numbers as indicated in the example.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

COVER PAGE i
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS   ii
ABSTRACT / EXECUTIVE SUMMARY iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS iv
I. INTRODUCTION 1
II. PROBLEM STATEMENT  2
III. BACKGROUND 3
IV. DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS 5
V. DESIGN ALTERNATIVES & EVALUATION   10
VI. DESCRIPTION OF DESIGN 15
VII. CONCLUSIONS 19
REFERENCES & BIBLIOGRAPHY 20
APPENDIX A. Analysis A.1
APPENDIX B. Manufacturing Plan B.1
APPENDIX C. Project Schedule  C.1
APPENDIX D. Purchased Parts Lists  D.1
APPENDIX E. Engineering Drawings  E.1
APPENDIX F. Project Budget F.1
 
other APPENDICES as required...  

iv

 

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click for info about  II. BODY
click for info about III. APPENDICES

 

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